World's First Robot Lawyer Sued by a Law Firm
 
 
 
 
 
 

World’s First Robot Lawyer Sued by a Law Firm for Lack of Law Degree

/ 09:31 AM March 14, 2023

DoNotPay, an AI-powered service that claims to be the first robot lawyer in the world, is facing allegations of practicing law without a license.

The tool, designed in a chatbot-style format, aims to provide accessible legal information. It can also self-help resources to assist consumers in their legal battles against large corporations.

ADVERTISEMENT

On March 3, a Chicago-based law firm named Edelson filed a proposed class action lawsuit against the robot lawyer. On Thursday, the website of the Superior Court of the State of California for San Francisco County published this information.

The plaintiff alleged that DoNotPay, to the detriment of its clients, is not truly a robot. It is not even a law firm or a lawyer. According to the complaint, DoNotPay needs a law degree.

In addition, it is not authorized to practice law in any jurisdiction and is not subject to any lawyer’s supervision.

Jonathan Faridian, a user of DoNotPay, has reportedly filed a lawsuit. He claimed that he utilized the service to create a range of legal documents. These are demand letters, a small claims court filing, and a job discrimination complaint.

Moreover, Faridian thought he had procured legal paperwork from a proficient attorney but instead received “substandard results.”

Joshua Browder, a former Stanford University student, established DoNotPay in 2015 with the initial aim of helping people appeal parking tickets in the UK.

Over time, the business has extended its services to include advice on various other topics. Some of which include delayed flights, workplace rights, and misleading advertising claims.

In addition, DoNotPay has made headlines for its potential to become the first robot lawyer to provide legal advice to a defendant in court. However, this historic moment did not materialize due to threats of imprisonment.

For more interesting news and articles, check out Inquirer.net.

Your subscription could not be saved. Please try again.
Your subscription has been successful.

Subscribe to our daily newsletter

By providing an email address. I agree to the Terms of Use and acknowledge that I have read the Privacy Policy.

Don't miss out on the latest news and information.
TAGS: interesting topics, lawyer, Robots, Trending
For feedback, complaints, or inquiries, contact us.
Your subscription could not be saved. Please try again.
Your subscription has been successful.

Subscribe to our daily newsletter

By providing an email address. I agree to the Terms of Use and acknowledge that I have read the Privacy Policy.




We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. To find out more, please click this link.