Mysterious 'Snake Cat' Photo Takes Internet by Storm Mysterious 'Snake Cat' Photo Takes Internet by Storm
 
 
 
 
 
 

Mysterious ‘Snake Cat’ Photo Takes Internet by Storm

/ 11:29 PM March 19, 2023

A photograph of a mysterious creature, dubbed the “snake cat” by internet users, has taken the internet by storm, leaving many puzzled and intrigued.

On Tuesday, a picture of the “Serpens Catus,” a feline with black and neon-yellow stripes that resemble a snake, gained popularity on social media.

The posts circulating the image claimed this feline is the “most uncommon feline species on the planet.”

An online user posted the photograph, which shows a creature with a snake-like body and a cat-like head, on social media and quickly went viral.

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People worldwide share their thoughts and theories about what the creature could be.

What Exactly is this Animal?

At first glance, the creature appears to be a hybrid of a snake and a cat, with a long, slender snake-like body and a head and face that are unmistakably feline.

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Its eyes are large and round, and its ears are pointed, giving it an almost alien-like appearance.

“Serpens catus is the rarest feline species on the planet. These animals live in extremely remote regions of the Amazon rainforest and are relatively poorly studied,” a Twitter user claimed.

The user added, “The first images capturing the snake cat appeared only in 2020, weighing up to 4 stones [56 pounds].”

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What People Think about it

Several commenters were also digging into a now-deleted Reddit post about “Serpens Cattus,” but they raised concerns about the authenticity of the feline.

“Obvious fake, No known gene can produce natural hair or fur of those (navy and bright yellow) colors,” one commenter said.

“Rough attempt at a fake Latin name,” a second person said. “One google about species naming would have made this much less obvious.”

It took little time for the photo to reach zoology experts. The color and patterns in the picture strongly resembled the eptilian boiga dendrophila.

The markings and patterns captured in the picture strongly resemble those of the boiga dendrophila. It is also known as the “gold-ringed cat snake,” a reptile species.

The Smithsonian’s National Zoo & Conservation Biology Institute states that the regions where the Amazon snake cat was rumored to reside are also home to the boiga dendrophila snake.

A TikTok user shared a video of the supposed serpent cat. The user is claiming that the feline is native to several countries.

These include Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Guyana, French Guiana, and Suriname.

Some believe the photograph is a hoax that someone created using digital manipulation or other means.

However, experts who have examined the photograph have stated that it appears genuine.

They also said that the creature in the photograph is not a product of any Photoshop techniques. Neither it is some sort of digital manipulation.

Despite the controversy and speculation surrounding the photograph, there still needs to be a clear answer as to what the creature could be.

While some experts have suggested that it could be a new species of snake, others have pointed out that the creature’s feline features are unlike anything they’ve seen in the reptile world.

For more interesting news and articles, check out Inquirer.net.

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TAGS: animals, cats, Trending
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