NASA's Innovative Space Cup Can Hold a Drink in Zero Gravity NASA's Innovative Space Cup Can Hold a Drink in Zero Gravity
 
 
 
 
 
 

NASA’s Innovative Space Cup Can Hold a Drink in Zero Gravity

/ 09:42 AM March 14, 2023

NASA has been developing a space cup in recent years that prevents liquids from escaping, even when the cup is open.

This innovative technology enhances the quality of life of astronauts living in the weightless environment of the International Space Station.

It provides valuable information for scientists looking to develop other plumbing systems for use in space.

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The National Aeronautics and Space Administration showcased a demo of NASA’s advanced space cup on Twitter.

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The video features astronaut Nicole Mann transferring coffee from a pouch to a specially designed cup, which she subsequently spins to show its spill-proof capabilities.

The caption read, “Classic cappuccino meets the space cup. This demo shows the Capillary Beverage examination, studying the process of drinking from specially built space cups using fluid dynamics to mimic the effect of gravity.”

Why Do Astronauts Need a Special Space Cup?

One challenge astronauts face during their missions is drinking fluids in a zero-gravity environment.

NASA’s innovative space cup solves this problem, allowing astronauts to enjoy a drink in space.

The space cup has a special design that can hold a liquid in zero gravity. It is made from a flexible plastic material that allows it to bend and adjust to the forces of zero gravity.

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The cup also has a lid that prevents the liquid from spilling out during spaceflight. The cover has a small opening that allows the astronaut to drink from the cup without the juice floating away.

The cup features a channel that runs from the bottom to the rim, which leverages capillary action between the drink and the cup’s wall to allow the beverage to move along the channel and reach the edge.

How the Space Cup was Designed

According to the team behind the Capillary Flow Experiment, the space cup operates on the same principles as traditional cups on Earth by utilizing surface tension, wetting conditions, and cup geometry.

Wetting refers to a liquid maintaining contact with a solid surface upon contact. A recent study in Nature Microgravity revealed that only a tiny amount of the drink enters the channel, while the rest stays at the bottom through capillary forces.

When astronauts drink from the cup, they spontaneously draw the liquid into their mouths. Then they can regulate the amount they drink by adjusting their mouth shape and suction.

The space cup has undergone extensive testing in NASA’s zero-gravity simulation chamber, which simulates spaceflight conditions.

During testing, the cup was full of water and subject to various forces to simulate zero gravity conditions.

The cup proved highly effective, successfully holding the water and allowing the astronaut to drink from it without spills.

Astronaut Don Pettit helped invent the space cup while on the space station. The patent was granted in 2011, which he shares with physicist Mark Weislogel and two mathematicians, Paul Concus and Robert Finns.

The space cup’s advancement

The development of the space cup was a collaborative effort between NASA and a company called IRPI LLC. NASA’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program funded the project.

It also supports small businesses in developing innovative technologies for space exploration. The tests aim to exhibit cup designs that use capillary forces, allowing crew members to consume various aqueous beverages in space.

These beverages could include simple fluids like water and juice and more complex fluids like cocoa, coffee, espresso, and fruit smoothies.

Besides allowing astronauts to drink fluids, the cup can store and transport other liquids, such as fuel or cleaning agents.

This can be useful during long-duration space missions where there aren’t enough resources, and every drop of fluid is precious.

NASA’s space cup solves a challenging problem faced by astronauts in space. The cup’s ability to hold a liquid in zero gravity opens up new possibilities for space exploration.

It makes it easier for astronauts to stay hydrated and nourished during their missions.

For more interesting news and articles, check out Inquirer.net.

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TAGS: innovation, NASA, space exploration, Trending
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